April
1 - 2009

Here come the hummingbirds

With spring in the air, it’s time for all birds to migrate northward. At our house, we have a finch feeder hanging from our front tree, and the birds are beginning to eat in pairs instead of singly with a lookout. We have a window feeder in the kitchen, but we keep startling the little sparrows that come. And Mlle. Cheap has plans to make a recycled materials feeder for the back yard.

Soon, our fast and furious feathered friends, the hummingbirds, will fly through town. In the southern United States, they are likely already migrating through. If you want to attract hummingbirds to your yard, check out  Getting Ready for Hummingbirds from TipNut.com.

Quick tips

You can set out your choice from among a wide variety of hummingbird feeders, filled with a simple sugar syrup. Do NOT dye the syrup red — there’s no need, and red dye can be unhealthy.

Change the syrup every couple of days so it doesn’t ferment and make the little birds ill. Wash the feeder out well with hot water; soap is not necessary.

Learn more about hummingbirds

TipNut links to a map that shows typical migration times for ruby-throated hummingbirds, which fly throughout the eastern U.S. and into Canada. The post also talks about planting a garden that’s alluring to hummingbirds.

You can learn more here about ruby-throated hummingbirds or, if you live farther west in the U.S., about rufous hummingbirds, which migrate through the Western states.  The site also links to Journey North, a hummingbird tracking project.

Find state-by-state migration information here.

Visit Hummingbirds.net to get answers to other questions, such as what to do if a hummingbird gets stuck in your garage. Best tip from that answer: Don’t leave your garage door open when you aren’t using the garage, and paint the bright red emergency pull handle on your garage door opener black so birds don’t mistake it for a delectable flower.

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