Category Archives: Home

June
10 - 2009

How is your bread?

Just about three and a half months ago, I published a lengthy post on the way I’ve been making bread, using a melding of techniques from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day and no-knead recipes. Since that time, I’ve kept on baking, and I wondered if you have, too.

June
3 - 2009
May
26 - 2009

The meaning of modern-day homesteading

This morning’s newspaper delivery brought an interesting little article about urban homesteading in The Denver Post, titled “Green (1/8th) Acres sprout in the city.” With its “urban Gothic” photo, it caught my eye, and even more so when I realized that the female member of the profiled couple is in my knitting/spinning group. (She noted that the reporter didn’t write about her knitting, spinning and sewing her own clothes, all just as worthy of the “homestead” title as growing your own food.)

May
22 - 2009

Friday Wrap-Up: Furlough edition

Actually, I’m not furloughed today, but city employees are. That means that some of my friends and some of the services I frequent are closed for a four-day weekend to shave $1 million off our city budget. Enjoy the day off — and everyone else, enjoy the long weekend. Here are some great resources from around the Web this week:

May
21 - 2009
May
15 - 2009

Friday wrap-up: ALREADY? edition

This week has been a busy one, and I can’t believe it’s already Friday! We are looking ahead to a fun weekend. I’m headed out for dinner and drinks with some friends I haven’t seen in ages (one just moved back to town), and Mlle. Cheap will be singing her heart out in a choir concert on Saturday afternoon. Plus, despite my garden protestations, we’ll be visiting the garden center to put a few plants in the ground, weather permitting. Meanwhile, here are some links to take you into the weekend.

May
14 - 2009
May
8 - 2009

Friday Wrap-Up: Spring Edition, cheap meals, frugal tips, onion bags and layoffs

After Colorado had a dry winter, then a very warm January and February, then a snowy March and April, I think we might be able to say it’s actually spring. This wrap-up comes to you after a day of 83-degree temperatures, squirrels marauding at the bird feeder and a cherry tree in bloom.

May
7 - 2009

Saving hundreds with new door locks

On Sunday afternoon, Mr. Cheap and I spent about 3 1/2 hours replacing five door locks. At the time, I wouldn’t have said I was glad I was doing it — rather, I was yearning to sit down with a cup of tea, maybe veg out with my spinning wheel and some TV or a good book; perhaps even take a nap.

But by Sunday night, I was glad I had done it, and here’s why.

The debacle started on Saturday ….

May
6 - 2009
May
5 - 2009

The scavenged garden makes gardening free

Gardening season is getting underway around the United States — from those in the South getting summer plants rolling, to those in the North finally able to stick a shovel in the ground. But with President Obama promoting “victory gardens” where Americans grow some of their own food (to promote thrift, food safety and a do-it-yourself ethic), it’s all too easy to join many other “green” trends where “green” refers to environmentally friendly solutions, but also to laying out a lot of money for something people used to just do.

April
22 - 2009
April
21 - 2009
April
20 - 2009
April
17 - 2009
April
5 - 2009

What’s In Your Garbage?

I’ve been wondering this very thing. Some weeks, I have no garbage to put out on the street. Other weeks, I have a lot. Typically, our weekly garbage pickup includes a couple of small (kitchen-size — 13-gallon) trash bags. So I got to wondering: Just what goes into our garbage?

The answer is: Mostly plastic. Garbage from eating out. As it happens, a lot of used tissues (although we are stocked with cloth handkerchiefs, I am the primary cheerleader for them, and I just don’t need to blow my nose that often, biologically. The household’s primary nose-blowers have been using paper, and I’m seldom there to catch them, twist their ears and make them use reusable). Et cetera.

Last week, I took photos of each day’s garbage. Here’s the score — along with some notes about what did not go into the garbage can.

April
3 - 2009
March
19 - 2009
March
18 - 2009

A good time to buy a house?

If you’ve been waiting for the right moment to buy a house, this might be the year to leap — if you have a job and money in the bank.  Here’s a rundown on what’s good about our housing market right now, according to Bills.com. “For individuals who have a steady source of income, good credit and cash in the bank, today could be an excellent time to purchase a home,” said Bills.com president Ethan Ewing. “Low prices, a large inventory of homes for sale, low interest rates and beneficial government programs have made this year one of the best ever to buy a home, especially for first-time home buyers.”

March
17 - 2009

Remaking a sweater

Yesterday I wrote about storing sweaters. But what if you look at your sweater collection and find a few duds that shouldn’t see the light of next season? Too small, too pilled, too short, too huge, just not right. You would think sweater projects would be perfect in the fall — but in the fall, you’re going to want to USE those projects. Plus, it’s National Craft Month! Get one or two ready now, and they’ll be all set to use this fall. Store sweater projects as you would store the sweaters they’re made from.