Recycle electronics now

What do you do when you get that final dial tone or your screen goes blank for good? Hopefully, you’ll recycle any piece of electronic equipment. Here’s why — PC Magazine reports:

Consumer electronics—including TVs, computers, peripherals, audio equipment, and phones—make up almost 2 percent of the municipal solid waste stream, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This percentage may seem small and inconsequential, but the quantity of electronic waste is steadily rising.

In fact, the EPA estimates that the number of obsolete consumer electronics sold between 1980 and 2007 is 235 million; a total weight of 2.25 million tons. Where are these 235 million units now? Eighteen percent of these products were collected for recycling; the rest are, unfortunately, sitting in landfills. Toxins (lead, mercury, flame retardants, and the like) from these electronics can seep into the soil and ground water, posing serious health and environmental risks.

In Denver — March 7, 2009

Denver-area residents, a reader notified me that LG is sponsoring electronics recycling bashes all around the metro area this weekend! You can drop off your unwanted computers, phones, TVs, VCRs, and much more for FREE recycling on Saturday, March 7. Check out all the information here.

Other electronics recycling resources

Not in Colorado or not ready to give up the VCR this weekend?

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Kitt March 6, 2009 at 1:27 am

Hey, handy! I was trying to find a place where Mom could take her old TV, and your link provided an answer. And I’ve also just assembled a pile of stuff to drop off at the Pepsi Center on Saturday. Thanks!

Reply

Jill March 6, 2009 at 7:13 am

I thought you might be interested in this article done by 60 minutes where they followed the trail of those recycled goods to china.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/11/06/60minutes/main4579229.shtml

Reply

cheaplikeme March 6, 2009 at 9:48 am

@Jill – Great, more depressing news. :)

All the more reason to first try to offer these goods to someone who can use them, if they are still working — and to avoid buying too many in the first place.

Reply

electronicguru March 9, 2009 at 2:55 pm

I’ve studied the growing problem of e-waste also and written articles about it. You can recycle it, but there is site where you can get paid to recycle it….much better then just donating it. check out Cashforlaptops.com!

Reply

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